Category: Environment

Climate Change as Genocide Inaction Equals Annihilation

Tomgram: Michael Klare, Do African Famines Presage Global Climate-Change Catastrophe?
Posted by Michael Klare at 8:19am, April 20, 2017.
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There are the terrorists, who get attention out of all proportion to their actual clout, and then there are those with big-time clout -- I think of them as the terrarists -- who get almost no attention at all. Back in May 2013, I came up with that term and here’s how I described those I thought it should apply to:

“We have a word for the conscious slaughter of a racial or ethnic group: genocide. And one for the conscious destruction of aspects of the environment: ecocide. But we don’t have a word for the conscious act of destroying the planet we live on, the world as humanity had known it until, historically speaking, late last night. A possibility might be ‘terracide’ from the Latin word for earth. It has the right ring, given its similarity to the commonplace danger word of our era: terrorist.

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Tell the Public Service Commission: Reject Keystone XL

The following message is from our allies at Bold Nebraska. Please take a moment to send a message to the Nebraska Public Service Commission to say NO to the Keystone XL Pipeline. Tell them we value our water over oil.

While President Trump just rubber-stamped his approval of a federal permit for TransCanada's proposed Keystone XL pipeline -- he doesn't get the final word on KXL -- Nebraska does.

TransCanada still needs a permit for a route through Nebraska, and has filed with the Nebraska Public Service Commission (PSC), which just launched an 8-12 month review of Keystone XL that will include public hearings slated for April-June (details to come).

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How to Create a Neighborhood Garden on your City Block

Here's what urban gardener Tim Rinne learned after he and his neighbors tore up their lawns for crops
Tim Rinne

For years now, Nebraskans for Peace has been counseling that we need to be re-localizing our food supply in the face of the threat climate change poses to agriculture. Having every bite of food on our plates traveling over 2,000 miles to get there as it does now (with nearly a fifth of that food imported from outside the country) is dangerously courting disaster.

The farther away we are from our food supply the more food insecure we are -- and nobody is more vulnerable than those of us who live in the urban environment where food-growing has been almost completely banished from the landscape.

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The Climate Crisis

Coming to Grips with the Truth of Our Situation

Creighton University Associate Professor Richard Miller delivered the keynote address at the 2016 Annual Peace Conference October 29 in Omaha. The article below, which he wrote specifically for the Nebraska Report, expertly summarizes the substance of his talk.

The climate change problem is unlike any other problem that we face as a society because it is irreversible on time scales of thousands of years with impacts that can last millions of years (e.g. the loss of biodiversity through species extinction). The shocking truth is that the decisions we make over the coming years will determine the conditions of life for human beings and non-human nature for thousands and possibly millions of years. This is due to the long life of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, the thermal inertia of the oceans, and the cascading effects that their enduring influence will bring into play.

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Berkshire Hathaway Shareholder Proposal

Resolution Requesting Divestment of Investments in Fossil-Fuel Companies

Lead filer: Nebraska Peace Foundation
Contact: Loyal Park, President, Nebraska Peace Foundation
lp94238@windstream.net • 402-489-6662

WHEREAS: Climate scientists assert with near unanimity that climate changes caused primarily by greenhouse gas emissions pose an existential threat to civilization. The ubiquitous burning of fossil fuels and their infrastructures must now be radically curtailed within a few short years to prevent the worst of possible consequences of climate changes.

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